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From Karen Darling at University of Chicago Press: Resources for Publishing Your First Book November 23, 2011

Posted by museumatt in Annual Meeting, Publishing, Resources.
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The panel of the Author's Workshop. David Kaiser of MIT, Karen Darling of the University of Chicago Press, Audra Wolfe of Outside Reader, and Marguerite Avery of MIT Press. Friday, November 4.

The Graduate and Early Career Caucus of the History of Science Society sponsored a well attended and lively Author Workshop on publishing  that included representatives from the University of Chicago Press, MIT Press, and independent editors. A full report on the GECC activities at the annual meeting is forthcoming. In the meantime workshop participant Karen Darling of the University of Chicago Press has followed up on a question from the audience about resources for aspiring authors on publishing. Here are her suggestions:

(Note that buying this books by clicking the links below through to Amazon.com will earn HSS and GECC a modest commission through the Amazon Associates Program. This does not apply to the JSTOR link or the University of Chicago Press link)

The Association of American University Presses Directory. The print version of the directory (available at http://www.press.uchicago.edu) includes descriptions of the editorial programs at individual university presses, as well as contact information, and so on. For an online directory of links to individual university presses, see http://www.aaupnet.org/aaup-members/membership-list.

Most university press websites offer submission guidelines.

William Germano, Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 2001; 2nd edition, 2008)

William Germano, From Dissertation to Book (University of Chicago Press, 2005)

Beth Luey, ed., Revising Your Dissertation: Advice from Leading Editors (University of California Press, 2004) and Handbook for Academic Authors (Cambridge University Press, 3rd edition, 1995)

Eleanor Harman, Ian Montagnes, Siobhan McMenemy, and Chris Bucci, eds., The Thesis and the Book: A Guide for First‐Time Academic Authors (University of Toronto Press, 2nd edition, 2003)

Susan Rabiner and Alfred Fortunato, Thinking Like Your Editor: How to Write Great Serious Nonfiction‐‐and Get It Published (W. W. Norton, 2002): although intended for authors of non‐academic, trade books, much of the advice here applies equally well to authors of scholarly books

Scott Norton, Developmental Editing: A Handbook for Freelancers, Authors, and Publishers (University of Chicago Press, 2009)

W. Brad Johnson and Carol A. Mullen, Write to the Top! How to Become a Prolific Academic (Palgrave, 2007)

Howard S. Becker, Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article (University of Chicago Press, 2nd edition, 2007)

Susan E. Abrams, “An Optimal Foraging Strategy for Scientist Authors,” American Scientist 77 (May‐June 1989), 227‐231 (Jstor link. Subscription or payment required for full article)

MLA Style Manual, 3rd edition: includes detailed advice on the review processes used by scholarly journals and presses, as well as information on copyright, fair use, and so on

The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition: definitive guidance on citation styles, and more, plus chapters on copyright, permissions, proofreader’s marks, and other practical aspects of authorship (also available online at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html)

Susan M. Bielstein, Permissions: A Survival Guide (University of Chicago Press, 2006)

John B. Thompson, Books in the Digital Age: The Transformation of Academic and Higher Education Publishing in Britain and the United States (Polity, 2005): a detailed report on the state of academic book publishing, a good book to give to naïve deans and chairs

John B. Thompson, Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty‐First Century (Polity, 2010): an overview of the American and British trade book publishing industry, based on thorough statistical study

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