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Fellowship Announcement: Linda Hall Library 80/20 Fellowship October 31, 2016

Posted by emmiemiller in Uncategorized.
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The Linda Hall Library is pleased to announce its fellowship program for the academic year 2017/18. Fellowships, lasting anywhere from one week to a full academic year, are awarded to outstanding projects in history of science and related science and technology studies fields that make use of the Library’s collections. Awards range from up to $3,000 per month for pre-doctoral fellows to $4,200 per month for post-doctoral fellows.

For the academic year 2017/18, the Linda Hall Library will also launch its innovative 80/20 Fellowship. To prepare graduate students for diverse career possibilities, 80/20 pre-doctoral fellows will spend 80% of their time pursuing dissertation-related research in the Library’s collections and 20% gaining valuable career-related skills as they plan, curate, and mount an exhibition based on their research and Library’s holdings. Check us out at http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships/

The Linda Hall Library, located next to the University of Missouri-Kansas City in Kansas City, Mo., is  among the world’s leading independent research libraries, boasting extensive primary and secondary sources related to environmental sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, earth sciences, engineering, astronomy, meteorology, and the life sciences. The Library holds more than 10,000 rare books dating from the 15th century to the present, as well as 500,000 monograph volumes and more than 48,000 journal titles from around the world, with especially strong holdings in Soviet and East Asian science. Its collections also contain conference proceedings, government publications, technical reports, and over 200,000 industrial standards. Fellows at the Linda Hall Library participate in a vibrant intellectual community alongside in-house scholars and colleagues from nearby research institutions.

All applications are due 1/16/2017.

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CV Review Preparation: Creating a Master CV October 14, 2016

Posted by emmiemiller in Uncategorized.
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In preparation for HSS Atlanta’s annual CV review, over the next several weeks, our Professionalization Officer, Thomas Darragh, will be sharing a series of blogs about crafting, updating, and getting the most out of your curriculum vitae (CV). If you’re interested in workshopping your CV at HSS, please be sure to sign up for the review by following the link!

In this week’s installment, he will outline the steps need to put your information into a master CV and how to use it to make templates for the other CVs you need.

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It is best to think of your master CV as your personal notes on what you have accomplished in your academic career. Nonetheless, you should make these notes as polished as possible—this will help you when you copy them over into your CVs that you use when applying for jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities.

If you followed the steps in the previous blog, you should already have a list of the information you need to add into your master CV. While there is no set standard to how you should put this information on your CV, some tried and true formats will help you get your information across in the most useful way possible. For your master CV, you may want to copy the formatting used by one of your advisors or peers, or you may wish to use this outline:

  • Name
    • Contact information
      • Address
      • E-mail
      • Phone
  • Education
    • Ph.D. program
      • School and department
      • Dissertation title and topic
      • Comp exams taken
      • Expected completion date
    • Master Program
      • School and department
      • Thesis title
      • Graduation Date
    •  Undergraduate Program
      • School and department
      • Degrees / Minors
    • Graduation Date
  • Teaching Experience
    • Class Title
    • Position (e.g. instructor, GA, TA)
    • School
    • Dates the course ran
  • Other Academic Job Experiences
    • Job Title
    • School or company name
    • Dates you held the position
  • Fellowships, Grants, and other Awards received
    • Title of awards
    • Award amount (hardly ever put on a CV, but this is useful information to have for your records)
    • Awarding body
    • Date received
    • What you used it for
  • Publications and Works in Progress
    • Any information you would need to cite your publication.
    • If it is not published yet, an expected publication date.
  • Conference Presentations, Workshops you have run, and other Papers, Posters, Displays and Lectures you have given
    • Title
    • Where it was given
    • Date
  • A list of conferences and workshops you have attended but not presented at.
    • Title
    • Date
  • Professional Activities and Service you have undertaken
    • Title
    • Dates
  • Professional Organizations you belong to
  • Areas of Interest you study
  • A list of your professional references

You can you a variety of templates and published CVs to get your wording and formatting the way you think is best for your CV. Once you have everything in place, it is only a matter of copying the information you need to a CV that you are sending out. For example, if you are applying for a fellowship, you can copy over you master CV information, making sure to put your research and awards sections towards the top, where the committee will be sure to see it. On the other hand, if you are applying for a one semester teach spot (where teaching experience is more important than your research awards), be sure to copy your teaching experience towards the top.

Remember, always update you Master CV as you gain new expertise.