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CV Review Preparation: Things to Avoid November 2, 2016

Posted by emmiemiller in Uncategorized.
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Dot your I’s and cross your T’s! Here’s the last post from our professionalization officer, Thomas Darragh, just in time for you to show off that CV at HSS 2016!

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One of the hardest things to do when crafting a CV is to figure out what information you should not include on it. Often, this happens when writing a CV for a program that is in a different country—often such programs have different standards for what you should include on a CV. In this blog, we will be going over what you should not include on a CV crafted for the American marketed. If your CV is for another market, you should spend some time online researching what the standards are for that market.

One of the hardest things to avoid is jargon and abbreviations. Make sure that you avoided language that may be unclear to the reader. For example, write out the full names of programs, conferences, and other items instead of using abbreviations. While you may know what HSS 2016 is, those reviewing your CV may not understand that HSS is the History of Science Society.

You also should avoid providing personal information on your CV. What counts as personal information varies; however, a good rule is not to include anything that it is illegal for potential employers to ask you during an interview. Such information includes your age, marital status, if you have children, your political affiliations, your race, and your religion.

While avoiding personal information on a CV may seem simple, remember that some of the committees, organizations, and other activities you may include on your CV may offer hints towards such information. For example, holding the chair of a LBGTQ (Lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, queer/question) organization will—rightly or wrongly—suggest something about your sexual orientation. In such cases, you need to ask yourself if including this information on a CV is necessary, or if it is information that is best kept off an application.

Finally, while it is expected in some cultures to include a headshot on your CV, avoid adding photos on a CV for the American market.

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Words to live by.

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Fellowship Announcement: Linda Hall Library 80/20 Fellowship October 31, 2016

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The Linda Hall Library is pleased to announce its fellowship program for the academic year 2017/18. Fellowships, lasting anywhere from one week to a full academic year, are awarded to outstanding projects in history of science and related science and technology studies fields that make use of the Library’s collections. Awards range from up to $3,000 per month for pre-doctoral fellows to $4,200 per month for post-doctoral fellows.

For the academic year 2017/18, the Linda Hall Library will also launch its innovative 80/20 Fellowship. To prepare graduate students for diverse career possibilities, 80/20 pre-doctoral fellows will spend 80% of their time pursuing dissertation-related research in the Library’s collections and 20% gaining valuable career-related skills as they plan, curate, and mount an exhibition based on their research and Library’s holdings. Check us out at http://www.lindahall.org/fellowships/

The Linda Hall Library, located next to the University of Missouri-Kansas City in Kansas City, Mo., is  among the world’s leading independent research libraries, boasting extensive primary and secondary sources related to environmental sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, earth sciences, engineering, astronomy, meteorology, and the life sciences. The Library holds more than 10,000 rare books dating from the 15th century to the present, as well as 500,000 monograph volumes and more than 48,000 journal titles from around the world, with especially strong holdings in Soviet and East Asian science. Its collections also contain conference proceedings, government publications, technical reports, and over 200,000 industrial standards. Fellows at the Linda Hall Library participate in a vibrant intellectual community alongside in-house scholars and colleagues from nearby research institutions.

All applications are due 1/16/2017.

CV Review Preparation: Creating a Master CV October 14, 2016

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In preparation for HSS Atlanta’s annual CV review, over the next several weeks, our Professionalization Officer, Thomas Darragh, will be sharing a series of blogs about crafting, updating, and getting the most out of your curriculum vitae (CV). If you’re interested in workshopping your CV at HSS, please be sure to sign up for the review by following the link!

In this week’s installment, he will outline the steps need to put your information into a master CV and how to use it to make templates for the other CVs you need.

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It is best to think of your master CV as your personal notes on what you have accomplished in your academic career. Nonetheless, you should make these notes as polished as possible—this will help you when you copy them over into your CVs that you use when applying for jobs, fellowships, and other opportunities.

If you followed the steps in the previous blog, you should already have a list of the information you need to add into your master CV. While there is no set standard to how you should put this information on your CV, some tried and true formats will help you get your information across in the most useful way possible. For your master CV, you may want to copy the formatting used by one of your advisors or peers, or you may wish to use this outline:

  • Name
    • Contact information
      • Address
      • E-mail
      • Phone
  • Education
    • Ph.D. program
      • School and department
      • Dissertation title and topic
      • Comp exams taken
      • Expected completion date
    • Master Program
      • School and department
      • Thesis title
      • Graduation Date
    •  Undergraduate Program
      • School and department
      • Degrees / Minors
    • Graduation Date
  • Teaching Experience
    • Class Title
    • Position (e.g. instructor, GA, TA)
    • School
    • Dates the course ran
  • Other Academic Job Experiences
    • Job Title
    • School or company name
    • Dates you held the position
  • Fellowships, Grants, and other Awards received
    • Title of awards
    • Award amount (hardly ever put on a CV, but this is useful information to have for your records)
    • Awarding body
    • Date received
    • What you used it for
  • Publications and Works in Progress
    • Any information you would need to cite your publication.
    • If it is not published yet, an expected publication date.
  • Conference Presentations, Workshops you have run, and other Papers, Posters, Displays and Lectures you have given
    • Title
    • Where it was given
    • Date
  • A list of conferences and workshops you have attended but not presented at.
    • Title
    • Date
  • Professional Activities and Service you have undertaken
    • Title
    • Dates
  • Professional Organizations you belong to
  • Areas of Interest you study
  • A list of your professional references

You can you a variety of templates and published CVs to get your wording and formatting the way you think is best for your CV. Once you have everything in place, it is only a matter of copying the information you need to a CV that you are sending out. For example, if you are applying for a fellowship, you can copy over you master CV information, making sure to put your research and awards sections towards the top, where the committee will be sure to see it. On the other hand, if you are applying for a one semester teach spot (where teaching experience is more important than your research awards), be sure to copy your teaching experience towards the top.

Remember, always update you Master CV as you gain new expertise.

CV Review Preparation: What is a CV? September 28, 2016

Posted by emmiemiller in Uncategorized.
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In preparation for HSS Atlanta’s annual CV review, over the next several weeks, our Professionalization Officer, Thomas Darragh, will be sharing a series of blogs about crafting, updating, and getting the most out of your curriculum vitae (CV). If you’re interested in workshopping your CV at HSS, please be sure to sign up for the review by following the link!

To start, he will outline some basics about CVs, explaining why you should have more than one and letting you know what you need to collect to make your first CV. In subsequent posts, he’ll cover building your CV, tailing it to specific jobs, and how to keep your CV up to date. Keep reading for more!

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What is a CV? It is best to think of it as your academic résumé.  It contains a list of everything you have done in academia, and it is often the first thing people will see when you apply for a job, a fellowship, or a conference. At its best, a CV will convey the levels of knowledge you possess about different subjects, and it will specify responsibilities you have had in past and current positions.

However, you should not view your CV as a single, unchanging document. You need to customize your CV to the jobs and programs you are applying for, meaning you want to have multiple CVs. You should have one that contains every detail about everything you’ve done. You can then use this master CV to cut and paste for other CVs. You may also find it handy to have a one-page copy and several other generic CVs on hand for various general positions, conferences, and funding opportunities. This way, you can use these as reference points when you need to customize a CV for a specific opportunity.

In creating your master CV, you should collect as much possible information about your academic career as possible. You’ll need to list any degrees, including majors and minors.  You will need an outline of all the presentations you have given, with titles, name of the conferences, and dates. You need to have your publications, a list of any workshops you have been to, and finally, anything else you think you may want to keep track of (such as contact information for your recommendation writers).

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In the next blog, we’ll walk you through putting all this information into your master CV and how to use it to make templates for any other CV you might need in the future.

By Thomas Darragh

CFP: Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence (Feb. 2017) September 21, 2016

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Call for Submissions: “Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence”
February 24-­25, 2017

The graduate students of Yale University’s Program in History of Science and Medicine are excited to invite submissions for a conference entitled “Critical Histories and Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence.”

We have been inspired by recent conversations at Yale and other campuses on how to address histories of racial violence, inequality, and erasure at colleges and universities, and how these histories continue to impact our learning environments today. The activism led by undergraduates in the NextYale movement created new spaces and momentum within our university for organizing around issues of racial violence and social justice. However, last fall, at an open forum for graduate students to discuss issues of race, racism, and diversity, we were disappointed when Yale Dean Lynn Cooley suggested that teaching future scientists about subjects such as race and ethnicity would not only be impractical but also unnecessary, dismissively stating “How would you teach race and ethnicity studies in a science course?”

There is a long history of scientists and doctors perpetuating violence and inequality through their work. Yale administration’s failure to acknowledge ­­ or perhaps, even ignorance of ­­ this history is a telling reminder of the injustice that continues to permeate our universities. In this case, it was graduate students who responded, including our colleague Viet N. Trinh who wrote “Is it so ridiculous for future doctors to recognize that groundbreaking medical advances were often only possible through experimentation on enslaved people? For public health experts to know that their predecessors in California and Texas not only regarded the myth of the ‘dirty, unhygienic Mexican’ as scientific fact, but also used said myth to concoct medical justifications for segregating, regulating, and controlling nonwhite bodies?…Racism is not a problem exclusively for historians and sociologists…As inheritors of its painful legacy, we must all reckon with racism not
just as a matter of personal principle, but of professional ethics.”[1]

Historians of science and medicine are well­-positioned to examine these issues, and not only because of our own disciplinary record of documenting violence in scientific and medical practice. We are, ultimately, concerned with issues of how knowledge is produced, whose knowledge is valued, and who has access to knowledge, issues that underlie histories of racism in science and medicine. We believe that we have unique expertise to address systemic inequality and critique structures of power and authority. Yet we also recognize that if we want to address discrimination in the broader academy, we need to look for injustice within our own discipline ­­ who has access to our field? And in turn, what knowledge and forms of scholarship have been privileged?

Finally, conversations within our scholarly community alone can only take us so far. This is a critical moment to build bridges with activists, organizers, and the communities beyond our campuses. We hope that this conference will begin conversations and help build alliances and strategies for addressing systematic violence and inequality, inside and outside of academia.

We call for submissions that address three broad themes:

1. History of Science and Medicine as a platform for change in the larger world: what can
academics do to effect change, and how can scholars build equitable and productive relationships with outside communities?
2. Social justice and racial violence itself as an object of academic study
3. Issues of social justice, inequality, and violence within History of Science and Medicine as a discipline.

We are looking for submissions that address any of these topics. We are interested in traditional academic papers, as well as discussions of activist work, artistic projects, archival and museum initiatives, and other presentations that address the themes of science, medicine and racial violence in some way. We are particularly interested in hearing from individuals who have made activism a crucial part of their scholarly work. The conference committee will group presentations into panels on related themes. Rather than a series of discrete presentations, though, we envision structuring this conference as a series of panel conversations between participants. We want to encourage dialogue, partnerships, and idea­-sharing that will continue after the conference is over.

Participants should submit a brief (300 words max.) proposal to historysciencejustice@gmail.com no later than November 15, 2016. The conference committee will review all proposals and respond to all submissions by December 15, 2016. Please circulate to anyone you think would be interested.
[1] Viet N. Trinh, “On Science and Racial Violence: A Letter to Lynn Cooley,” ed. Amanda Joyce Hall,Conversation X, December 1, 2015. Retrieved from http://www.conversationx.com/2015/12/01/on­science­and­racial­violence/